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Sports and Fitness

Indoor Cricket As A Great Winter Sport

For active athletes like me, winter time does not mean an end to playing sports. As a cricket player, I find that the indoor version of the game is even more exciting than the outdoor sport. A round of indoor cricket allows me to sweat it out while the temperatures are low, which is why I regularly spend time at the nearest indoor cricket stadium.

These stadiums have a rectangular court with an artificial grass surface, enclosed by netting 4 meters high. The stumps and the pitch are also the same dimensions. It was developed in the end of 1970s, when changes to the outdoor version of the sport made it a success. Compared to outdoor cricket, it is much more inclusive and can be played by professional cricketers and beginners alike. Even my children join a game or two and can really play with adults. My favorite part is that it can be played all year round, whether the sun is shining or it is raining.

Highlights Of Indoor Cricket

Active participation is a huge part of indoor cricket. The outdoor version is normally dominated by top players, with others just standing idle on the boundary line. On the other hand, this version allows everyone to bowl and bat, which is why every single player gets to run around and sweat. The ball is not as hard as the regular cricket ball and it does not require as much skill or fitness (meaning no one has to run a hundred yards to get the ball nor do they have to throw it over the same distance). Because of the softer ball, I do not need as much protective gear.

The game can be scored in a few ways and each game has 2 innings. Each inning will last 16 overs, meaning each of the 6 players of the 2 sides will be able to bowl 2 overs. Each batsman will face 4 overs. Some indoor stadiums may have 8 players on each side, so the conditions and rules will differ a little. Moreover, because of the smaller court size, the players are never too far away to be involved in the game nor am I too exhausted from having to run too much.

Despite the differences between indoor and outdoor cricket, even professional cricketers can enjoy the games in the stadium when the summer season (and cricket season) is over. This way, they can stay active and fit even during winter time, even be able to hone their skills in preparation for the next season.

Scoring An Indoor Cricket Game

There are 2 areas of scoring an indoor cricket, physical and bonus runs. The first runs are scored by the 2 batsmen who complete a run from one crease all the way to the other. On the other hand, bonus runs get scored when a ball hits the net. Specifically, bonus scores are differentiated by the zones.

Hitting Zone A or the front net behind the keeper nets 0 runs, but 1 run is awarded at Zone B or the side net between the striker’s end and half of the way down the pitch. Zone C, or the side nets between the halfway point and the bowler’s end, gives 2 runs. Hitting Zone D, or the back net behind the bowler nets 4 runs if the ball hits on the bounce and 6 runs on the full. From Zone B or C to Zone D gives 3 runs. However, a physical run has to be scored for a bonus run to be scored.

The winner is the team that has a higher score at the end of each inning, and the second inning will continue for the full 16 overs even when the batting side surpasses the total of the first innings.

As an active sportsman, indoor cricket is my favorite game to play during winter. This active and exciting game will ensure every player gets a chance to play, so I am truly able to reap all the benefits of exercise during the game. 

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